Articles

Copper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 published

COPPER IN ALL ITS FORMS

As usual, this issue presents some of the best architecture from around Europe. It showcases the rich variety of surfaces that copper and its alloys can deliver for contemporary design – whether gold, brown, green or blue – all living materials continuing to develop in the local environment. But what stands out from our eleven projects is the wealth of different, sometimes innovative, approaches taken by designers today with how and where they use copper.

We start with a multi-layered, perforated copper drum: the central focus of Trondheim’s central square (pages 4-5). Daylight plays on its hand-patinated surface adding richness to this floating canopy, then at night it becomes luminescent in its own right. Transparency is also key to a new cultural centre in Corsica (pages 6-11). Here, a copper alloy mesh veil shields the building from the sun, creating changing perspectives from inside and out.
 
In Finland’s copper town of Pori, the material creates a monolithic solidity countering wide expanses of glazing and balconies on a landmark residential tower (pages 12-13). Despite sharing its typology, a Parisian apartment block (pages 14-17) takes a different stance, instead using copper alloy in highly structured storey-height panels, then adding texture with material perforations. Storey-height panels of copper also define Gembloux’s new town hall (pages 18-21) but here the material continues over roofs as well forming a complete external skin.
 
Although copper is an intrinsically thin material, with considered design it can take on a massive character. This is exemplified by a new courthouse extension (pages 22-23), both respecting and subverting the rusticated masonry of its historic neighbour.Developing the relationship between old and new is one of copper’s real strengths. This is demonstrated further by a modern intervention to a historic Polish waterworks – now the Hydropolis ‘museum of water’ (pages 24-27). Here, perforated copper sits naturally next to the animated water sculptures that define the building’s new life.
Next, we move indoors: effectively, buildings within buildings. Red Bull’s Berlin recording studio (pages 28-31) is a sculptural object within a redundant power station, formed of horizontal copper bands that redefine the intermediate space around it, as well as within. Similarly, beautifully crafted brass installations have remodelled and created an identity for a street-level, shell office in London (pages 32-33).  
 
With a nod to one of the material’s most traditional applications, Herzog & de Meuron have roofed in copper discreet buildings within their museum remodelling in Colmar, France (pages 34-37) with detailing that is deceptively low-key yet timeless. In contrast our final project, a designer store in Sweden (pages 38-39), is unashamedly modern. Copper alloy is used over both wall and roof planes, with rigorous detailing and joint alignment emphasising the continuity of the metal skin.
We hope you enjoy this issue of Copper Architecture Forum but we still want to continually improve the magazine. Please do share your views with us in our survey on the copperconcept.org website – and thanks to those of you who already have. 
 
Finally, a call for entries to the 2017 European Copper in Architecture Awards – a celebration of the best contemporary design with copper. 
 
 

Order your free printed copy: CAF subscription

Download iBook for iPad or read online: CAF 41/2016 online

Related articles: 
Share: 
Copper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 publishedCopper Architecture Forum magazine 41/2016 published

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. Find out more by following this link.

Accept